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Creating A Culture Conducive To Excellence

Research into high performance (Holbeche, 2005) suggests that while individual performances can have a strong impact on short-term success, it is the culture of the organization that has a more significant bearing on the long-term sustainability of high performance.

Talented individuals can achieve a great deal even when working in a rigid or toxic culture, but they can usually only do so for a short period.  They are much more likely to keep on giving their best when working in a culture conducive to high performance.  

Cultural Characteristics Associated with High Performance Environments:

  • Changeable
  • Knowledge rich context for innovation
  • Boundaryless
  • Stimulate people to higher levels of performance
  • Great places to work
  • Values based
What some great coaches have to say about the culture of a program:
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Transform An Idea Into An Outcome With Impact

The planning that goes into making any idea a reality involves five distinct stages – purpose, vision, brainstorm, organization, next actions.

In most situations coaches/boards/programs get bogged down with the organization of the project. I.e., “How will we do this? Who will take care of that? What’s our timeline on this?”

While these are all necessary considerations, in general, people need to spend significantly less time with the organization of a project.

Instead, they need to think more about the purpose, galvanize more the vision of how cool the outcome might really people, create and collect more potentially useful ideas and perspectives, and decide and distribute accountabilities for specific next actions more consistently.

Do we know why we are doing this? Have we fully opened our brains to consider what the end result should look like? Have we thought outside the box, stretching appropriately into a wild vision of success? As we move to thinking about how we are going to do things, have we surfaced all the potentially relevant details and perspectives?

Only after factoring in these considerations can we effectively organize into structures, major components, sequences and priorities. Purpose, vision, brainstorm, next actions – If those additional four levels of thinking are sufficient, you’ll have the right organization when you get to it and the appropriate moving parts actually in motion as well.

Remember, don’t mistake activity for productivity.