Category Archives: USA Swimming

ASCA and USA Swimming Team Up For The New England Coaches Clinic In Boston, October 7-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASCA will offer the FINIS-ASCA Level 2 Stroke School on Friday morning through afternoon, October 7 as a preliminary event to the USA Swimming Regional Clinic which begins on Friday Evening and continues through Sunday morning.

There is limited room in the USA Swimming portion of the clinic, but still a few spots available.

There is LOTS of room in the Level 2 Stroke School.

ALL coaches are eligible to attend the FINIS-ASCA Stroke School. There are no prerequisites and the course is open to Non-ASCA members and non-USA Swimming coach members. (Everybody means everybody!)

This special edition Stroke School focuses on constructing and correcting strokes, starts, and turns for developmental swimmers of all ages. The emphasis is on progressions and teaching techniques.  This is a great course for coaches of novice swimmers – regardless if they are 9th graders on their first high school swimming experience or novice 9 year olds on the club team.  Even if you have already taken the Level 2 Stroke School, this course will offer new information directed toward the developmental swimmer.

Registration for the Stroke School is separate from the USA Swimming portion of the clinic.  Call the ASCA Office today and register for the Stroke School (800-563-4930).

Click here for complete ASCA and USA Swimming details and registration information.

https://www.swimmingcoach.org/pdf/2011%20New%20England%20Coaches%20Clinic%20and%20Level%202.pdf

Awards Roundup & Notables — ASCA World Clinic & USAS Convention 2011

SAN DIEGO, CA–At the American Swimming Coaches Association’s (ASCA’s) annual World Clinic held earlier this month in San Diego, California, Gregg Troy was named the USA’s Coach of the Year for 2011. Troy’s work with Ryan Lochte, Elizabeth Beisel, Peter Vanderkaay and Dagny Knutson were cited in the honoring.

Also at the 2011 ASCA World Clinic, Richard Shoulberg was elected ASCA President for 2012. Four additional coaches were also elected to the organization’s Board for 2012-14 terms: Jack Bauerle, David Marsh, Tim Murphy and Eddie Reese.

JACKSONVILLE, FL–In USA Swimming related news, annual award winners were announced as part of last week’s 2011 United States Aquatics Sports (USAS) Convention, which featured the annual meetings of USA Swimming, US Masters Swimming, USA Diving and USA Synchro (USA Water Polo’s annual meeting is held at a different time of year). USA Swimming’s highest honor, the USA Swimming Award, this year went to Coach Richard Shoulberg. Additional swimming-related awards presented at the convention were:

-Coach of the Year: Gregg Troy, University of Florida

-Developmental Coach of the Year: Brian Brown, Hydro Swim Team

-Disability Coach of the Year: Jim Andersen, Black Dog Swimming

-Masters Coach of the Year: Chad Durieux, Rose Bowl Masters

 

-Swimmer of the Year: Ryan Lochte

-Open Water Swimmers of the Year: Ashley Twichell (female), Alex Meyer (male)

-Disability Swimmer of the Year (co-awarded): Mallory Weggemann and Marcus Titus

http://www.usaswimming.org/ViewNewsArticle.aspx?TabId=0&itemid=3753&mid=8712

 

Also as part of the Masters convention, Nadine Day was elected as USMS President for 2012-14, replacing Jeff Moxie; and the host of the 2013 Pan American Masters Championships was announced as Sarasota, Florida.

The Purpose and Measurement of a Swim Meet

The Swim Meet Coach – Part II.

“Purpose and Measurement of a Swim Meet

by John Leonard

In the first part of this series, we identified that there are specific skills to develop in coaching at a swim meet as opposed to “practice coaching”. In this article, we’ll begin to explore those skills. We’ll begin with thinking about the swim meet experience conceptually.

Lets first answer the question, “What Do You Think The Purpose Of A Swim Meet Is?”

 To begin, lets make an assumption, and that is, that we are purpose driven human beings attempting to teach purpose to young people. If that is the case, then there are several possible purposes of packing up the family and going to a swim meet.

It is an opportunity to test the quality and durability of what you have learned in practice. Why practice if not to compete and test it? This is a universal, regardless of summer league meet, USA Swimming meet, or high school/collegiate competition.

It is an opportunity to enjoy racing with other swimmers. In most meets, athletes are grouped according to relative abilities, so you’ll be competing with people relatively similar to yourself in ability. While this is likely true in highly organized competition like YMCA, USA-S age group meets, the grouping of athletes is likely to be less homogeneous in high school or summer league competition. You may be in over your head, or you may not have sufficient competitive challenge in your event.

It is a quality opportunity to see if you are a better swimmer today than you were the last time you competed. Universally true. Test yourself. Don’t depend on the competition. Test Yourself.

It is an opportunity to grow to a new level in our sport. If you are an age grouper, a chance to get a new B time, new A time, new AAA time. If a senior swimmer, a chance for a new Sectional cut, Junior or Senior National cut, or, if a high school swimmer, advance to your district or state meet.

It is FUN! Go enjoy it. Make the experience exciting, positive and fun. Learn and appreciate.

The point here is, every swim meet, every swim at every swim meet, should have one or more of the above purposes in mind. The athlete needs coach leadership to understand and put in context, the purpose of the meet and the swim. Don’t let athletes get into the “same old, same old” rut. Set appropriate purposes for each swim in front of each swimmer.

Sometimes its as simple as scoring points for your team in a dual meet. Sometimes it can be pretty complicated. But Purpose is everything!

And the backside of purpose of course, is evaluation. Once the purpose is set, then the coach and athlete need to work together to analyze the result and prepare for the next race, next meet, next season. The good coach becomes skilled at evaluation.

Evaluation may come in various time frames. First, is when the athlete walks back from the blocks. There is an art to good communication with the athlete immediately following the swim, and in this series of articles, we’ll explore the nature and content of those communications.

Second, is more in-depth post meet evaluation to look carefully at the entire meet and performances in context. Third, is the sort of end of season analysis that looking back at each meet in the season can provide.

Good evaluation comes from data. Facts. “Feelings” and “opinions’ are certainly to be respected, and considered. But over time, most coaches have come to the conclusion that facts help form solid opinions and therefore, facts are important to assemble in as much depth as possible.

So, how do you measure results at a swim meet? Here are some ways.

  • Did you have a lifetime best time?
  • Did  you have a seasonal best time?
  • Did you swim the race with the effort pattern that  you had planned?
  • Did you swim the race with the technical elements that you had planned? (Stroke, turn, start, etc.)
  • Did you get the competitive result you sought? (Placing)

And of course, you can add others!

While certainly it is important to select ONE of the above as a primary objective of each swim, the fact is that sometimes swimmers, regardless of experience level, play “mix and match” (“I want to swim a best time and win the race.”) This makes it significantly more difficult to evaluate the race competently.

Now, as the coach, what do you measure?

Here are some ideas:

Measure percent of best times. (lifetime or seasonal)  “We swam 100 races this weekend. We had 42 best times. Our best time percentage for the weekend is 42%.”

Measure the number of new B, A, AA, etc. times on the team. “We had 14 new B times, 3 new A times and 2 new AAAA times, great job!”

Measure the  number of new  Sectional, JR, Sr. National qualifying times. Celebrate those!

Measure the percentage of best times in prelims. In finals. Track these. Compare over time.

Measure the total number of seconds improved by the entire team added together. This is a great “team incentive” that everyone can contribute to.

Measure the percent of best times by stroke. (“We had 22% best season times in backstroke.”)

Measure the percent of best times by distance. (“We had 46% best times in events 400 and longer, and 58% best times in teh 100’s”)

Measure best times by age group. (“the 10 and under girls swam 75% best ever times this past weekend! Congratulations!”)

Measure best times by gender. Then Gender and age group.

The more you measure, the more you have to think about. And you are thinking about FACTS. (Having facts also help in discussion with parents, who typically begin a conversation with “I think…” or “I feel…”  You have the facts.)

Having the facts allows  you to have intelligent post meet conversations with athletes.

“How do you think you did?”

“What was good? What was not so good? What can you improve on?”

“Why?”

“What can we do about it? What do you think we should work on in practice with you?” What can you do to get better?”

Facts also allow you to have intelligent conversations with the team as a whole. “Here is how we did. These are the facts. What do you think? What common traits do you see? What do we need to concentrate on? What simple things can we do as a group in practice to improve?”

Facts allow you to discuss performances with your coaches from a common ground. (if you have a staff.)

Facts allow you to give real information on athlete performance and improvement to your Athletic Director and Principal (whether he wants them or not!) and to your Board of Directors.

Having facts, means that you can be evaluated with facts. Most of us prefer this. (Though, sadly, not all….some want to get by on their charm and good looks…if you are not so blessed, facts can help.)

Summary: think about and have a PURPOSE. Develop and have FACTS!

 

 

Don’t Miss Out on the Clinic of the Dakotas!

April 29- May 1, 2011

Butler Machinery Education Center

3401 33 ST S

Fargo, ND 58104

Sponsored by North Dakota and South Dakota Local Swim Committee, American Swimming Coaches Association, FINIS, Speedo and Epic Sports

Presenters

David Salo – Head Coach of University of Southern California and former Head Coach of Irvine

Guy Edson – American Swim Coaches Association Technical Program Director

Randy Julian – USA Swimming Sport Development Consultant

Mike Stromberg – Head Coach of Falfins Swimming

Schedule

Friday, April 29

1:00 – 4:45 Starts, Turns, and Finishes – Guy Edson, ASCA course sponsored by FINIS

5:00 Registration for those not attending Starts, Turns & Finishes Course

5:30 – 6:30 Coaches Roundtable:  The current state of swimming in the Dakotas. Moderated by Randy Julian, USA Swimming

6:45 – 8:00 Preparing a Club Swimmer for College Swimming – David Salo

8:15 Team Growth:  Ideas and Tactics You Can Use Today – Mike Stromberg

Saturday, April 30

8:00 Coffee
8:30 – 9:30 Training Philosophy – David Salo

9:45 – 10:45 Sports Psychology You Can Actually Use – Guy Edson
11:00 – 12:00 Breaststroke – David Salo

12:00 – 1:30    Lunch

1:30 – 2:30      Dryland Training Ideas – David Salo

2:45 – 3:30      Test Sets and How to Use Them – Coach Salo

3:45 – 4:45    Questions and Answers with Coach Salo
5:00 – 5:45      Age Group Dryland Training in a Parallel Universe – Guy Edson

Sunday, May 1

8:30 Coffee
9:00 – 10:00 Habits of Highly Successful Coaches – Guy Edson

10:15 – 11:15 Coaches Roundtable: Making Swimming Better in the Region.  Moderated by Randy Julian

Clinic Registration Form

Hotel Information

Expressway Suites 877.239.4303

4303 17th Ave. South – Fargo, North Dakota

Ask for Swim Clinic Rate

Clinic Application Form and Fee:  $85.00 payable to NDLSC

ASCA Course Fee:  $30.00 payable to ASCA

Additional Clinic Information

Mike Stromberg

719-963-8355

mikes@falfins.org

Additional ASCA Information

Guy Edson

800-356-2722

gedson@swimmingcoach.org

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